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Not her father’s daughter

I’m not one to go about picking on other’s research, but I suppose (with five years of Emmett Wilson research — that’s way over 10,000 hours of continuous digging and nit-picking) I can safely call myself an Emmett Wilson Expert. …at least, that’s what my colleague (who is a credible […]

Coffee-spit-worthy Clip

I admit I spewed a bit of coffee this morning when I saw this new-to-me clip freshly found in the January 3, 1917 edition of The Pensacola Journal: “Mrs. Emmett Wilson?” GAH. I turned immediately to all of my known and collected documents — and breathed a huge sigh of […]

Cemetery picnics

Here’s a great article from Atlas Obscura on a once popular fad,  picnics in cemeteries. Actually, I think it’s great — I’m not just saying that because I like to hang out in cemeteries ‘getting to know’ the individuals who will play prominent roles in Emmett’s book — but there’s […]

Modeste Sierra Hargis

I have new information to share on Modeste Hargis, entrepreneur, professional whistler, and Emmett’s pharmacist! It’s the obituary for Modeste Hargis‘ mother, Modeste Sierra Hargis, from the Pensacola Daily News, Friday, January 22, 1904, page 1: I love finding these old obituaries; they often include a sentimental (and perhaps charitable!) […]

Eclectic Research Findings

As mentioned in previous posts, I do regular check-ins for new/updated items in databases for information about Emmett Wilson. Following is an mix of different/oddball items of interest: First, the actual copyright information for Emmett’s official portrait for his first term in office. Notice that there are two dates. The […]

Dual Classification

One of the more curious (to me) stories about Emmett Wilson’s education centers around his attendance at West Florida Seminary in Tallahassee, Florida. Sometime around 1899 (when he was about 17 years old), Emmett applied for admission to West Florida Seminary, minus a high school diploma. It wasn’t unheard of […]

Wilson Tradition

In keeping with Emmett’s family tradition, I’m headed off to my precinct in five minutes: Only the Wilson men were eligible to serve in their precincts before women’s suffrage; I’d love to know if any of the Wilson women served as officials or voting judges after 1919. Regardless, it’s interesting […]

Henry Lee Bell Photograph Collection

In the University of West Florida Archives, there’s a wonderful collection of more than 20,000 photographs of everyday Pensacolians between 1911 and 1949. Henry Lee Bell opened photography studio in 1911 in Pensacola Florida. Used to be partnered with George Turton. Was Turton & Bell around 1900 to about 1911, […]