Update: New Article on Emmett’s Twin Brother Julian

Standard

I’ve been spending the last few days of 2017 checking in with old databases and past sources, to tie up any loose ends, or to check on any updates.

Surprise! A ‘new-to-me’ publication found on Google Books, The Train Dispatcher (1950, Vols 32-33, p. 674), has a retirement article on Emmett’s twin brother, Julian Anderson Wilson!

Source: The Train Dispatcher, Vols. 32-33, 1950, via Google Books

There’s good information in this brief bio about Julian’s retirement in 1950. One thing that stood out was that Julian spent almost a half-century working for the railroad.

Another interesting fact is that he started out as a clerk-operator on the P&A (Pensacola & Atlantic) division of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad in December 1900 — this means he started working for the railroad AFTER Emmett did. I’d had the impression they started working for the railroad at the same time, but Emmett began first, when he was about 15 or 16, about 1897.

Emmett also started out as a clerk-operator, eventually working his way up as a telegrapher/manager of smaller train stations along the P&A line.  Likely it was big brother Meade or Frank Jr. who helped Emmett get the position. By1899, Emmett was no longer with the railroad, as he was enrolled at West Florida Seminary (now Florida State University) as of December of that same year.

The retirement article also mentions a three-year period when Julian wasn’t working for the railroad; this is confirmed by Julian’s family members who told me he became a Morse code expert (a telegrapher) on a steamship during this time. In fact, Julian’s steamship was the Gertrude, which plied the Chattahoochie River.

A side view of the steamboat “Gertrude,” taking on a supply of wood, about 1905. Source: Florida Memory

Advertisements

Something New

Standard

IMG_0856

I signed up to be an election judge this year, for the November 8 general election. The training is rather easy: You read the materials the election board provides, then take an exam. If you pass the examination, you’ll be contacted later for an in-person classroom training session.

Interestingly, I’ve discovered in Emmett’s research that three of his brothers — Percy, Frank Jr. and Meade — served as precinct judges, monitors, or managers in different state and national elections for years. Max didn’t; neither did Cephas, Meade, or Emmett, as they were candidates themselves, or served in some elected/appointed capacity (for example, Emmett was appointed Assistant U.S. Attorney in 1906), which would disqualify them. But, they could have served as an election judge, at least up until the time they decide to run for office, as did Meade Wilson, below:

Meade Wilson was an election judge, at least up until the point he ran for office in 1909. Source: The Pensacola Journal, April 1909.

Meade Wilson was an election judge, at least up until the point he ran for office in 1909. Source: The Pensacola Journal, April 1909.

Here’s the outcome of that election:

The Pensacola Journal, May 2, 1909.

The Pensacola Journal, May 2, 1909.